Do You Know How does SSL certificate work?

How Does the SSL Certificate Create a Secure Connection?

When a browser attempts to access a website that is secured by SSL, the browser and the web server establish an SSL connection using a process called an “SSL Handshake” (see diagram below). Note that the SSL Handshake is invisible to the user and happens instantaneously.

Essentially, three keys are used to set up the SSL connection: the public, private, and session keys. Anything encrypted with the public key can only be decrypted with the private key and vice versa.

Because encrypting and decrypting with private and public key takes a lot of processing power, they are only used during the SSL Handshake to create a symmetric session key. After the secure connection is made, the session key is used to encrypt all transmitted data.

Want to know How to make career in Ethical Hacking

  1. The browser connects to a web server (website) secured with SSL (https). Browser requests that the server identify itself.
  2. The server sends a copy of its SSL Certificate, including the server’s public key.
  3. Browser checks the certificate root against a list of trusted CAs and that the certificate is unexpired, unrevoked, and that its common name is valid for the website that it is connecting to. If the browser trusts the certificate, it creates, encrypts, and sends back a symmetric session key using the server’s public key.
  4. The server decrypts the symmetric session key using its private key and sends back an acknowledgement encrypted with the session key to start the encrypted session.
  5. Server and Browser now encrypt all transmitted data with the session key.

 

Want to know about AWS Certificate Manager.

 

Why can you trust Google.com by trusting GeoTrust?

A website wants to communicate with you securely. In order to prove its identity and make sure that it is not an attacker, you must have the server’s public key. However, you can hardly store all keys from all websites on earth, the database would be huge and updates would have to run every hour!

The solution to this is Certificate Authorities, or CA for short. When you installed your operating system or browser, a list of trusted CAs probably came with it. This list can be modified at will; you can remove whom you don’t trust, add others, or even make your own CA (though you will be the only one trusting this CA, so it’s not much use for public website). In this CA list, the CA’s public key is also stored.

When Google’s server sends you its certificate, it also mentions it is signed by GeoTrust. If you trust GeoTrust, you can verify (using GeoTrust’s public key) that GeoTrust really did sign the server’s certificate. To sign a certificate yourself, you need the private key, which is only known to GeoTrust. This way an attacker cannot sign a certificate himself and incorrectly claim to be Google.com. When the certificate has been modified by even one bit, the sign will be incorrect and the client will reject it.

So if I know the public key, the server can prove its identity?

Yes. Typically, the public key encrypts and the private key decrypts. Encrypt a message with the server’s public key, send it, and if the server can repeat back the original message, it just proved that it got the private key without revealing the key.

 

4 thoughts on “Do You Know How does SSL certificate work?

    • December 5, 2017 at 6:57 pm
      Permalink

      Thanks Nawaz, Let me know if you want me write about any other topic.

      Reply
    • January 19, 2018 at 9:17 pm
      Permalink

      Sure, Share more details what detail you are looking for.

      Reply

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